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Extension > Poultry News & Events > October 2017

Friday, October 20, 2017

Principles #3 & #4: Line of Separation and Perimeter Buffer Area

By Abby Neu
Extension Educator, Poultry
neux0012@umn.edu | (320) 235 - 0726 x 2019

and Hannah Lochner
Extension Livestock Communications Intern


*Please note any templates or resources that can help you, can be found in a Google Drive folder, available to everyone.  Bookmark the site: https://z.umn.edu/NPIP for easy access.  If a resource is referenced in a post, it is linked directly to the Google Drive.


An established Line of Separation and Perimeter Buffer Area plays a significant role in reducing the amount of pathogens entering and leaving poultry premises.

The Line of Separation (LOS) is defined as a functional line separating poultry housing and the poultry inside, the clean side, from exterior or outside disease exposure, the dirty side. A common LOS are the walls of the poultry barn with deviations at the entry and exit sites.

The Perimeter Buffer Area (PBA) serves a similar purpose; however, it refers to a functional boundary surrounding the farm site that separates animal barns from areas unrelated to animal production. The poultry houses, raising areas, nearby structures, and high traffic areas related to daily functions should all be included in the Perimeter Buffer Area. Your house or equipment sheds may be outside of the PBA, since they are directly unrelated to poultry production occurring on the site.

Both of these biosecurity features need to be clearly described or illustrated in your biosecurity plan. An easy way to diagram the Line of Separation and Perimeter Buffer area on your farm is to outline an aerial image of your farm site.

This video will show you step-by-step how to do this using a computer which has an internet connection and Google maps. A full demonstration using a Windows computer starts at 2:32 and a MAC version is demonstrated starting at 5:57.

WINDOWS

Step 1. Using Google Maps, enter the address of your facility and click search

Step 2. Select “Satellite” view (bottom left of screen) to see aerial image of your site.

Use the plus (+) and minus (-) bars on the bottom right-hand side of your screen to zoom in and out to include the entire site and perimeter respectively.

Step 3. For Window’s open the “Snipping Tool” from your Start Menu,

select New, then drag your cursor over the aerial view of your farm.

Step 4. *Optional* Indicate where your Line(s) of Separation are as well as your Perimeter Buffer Area. If you do not do this on your computer, this needs to be completed by hand when you have a hard-copy of the aerial image. Selecting different colors or shading can further help distinguish these areas.

Step 5. Save a copy of your snip on your computer as a photo file. This can be a JPEG, JPG, PNG or other media file.

MAC

Step 1. Using Google Maps, enter the address of your facility and click search

Step 2. Select “Satellite” view (bottom left of screen) to see aerial image of your site.

Use the plus (+) and minus (-) bars on the bottom right-hand side of your screen to zoom in and out to include the entire site and perimeter respectively.

Step 3. Create the image by pressing Command + Shift + 4 simultaneously on their keyboards which opens the “screen shot” application. Drag your cursor over the aerial view of your farm to select the image

Step 4. *Optional* Indicate where your Line(s) of Separation are as well as your Perimeter Buffer Area. If you do not do this on your computer, this needs to be completed by hand when you have a hard-copy of the aerial image. Selecting different colors or shading can further help distinguish these areas.

Step 5. Save a copy of your snip on your computer as a photo file. This can be a JPEG, JPG, PNG or other media file.

Along with including a diagram of the Line of Separation and Perimeter Buffer Area on your farm, you should also have an outline of instructions for any individuals who will be entering and exiting either one these areas. Written manuals, training videos, signage, etc. are all appropriate tools to inform visitors, employees, and utility and service providers of the procedures taken into consideration when entering and exiting each area.

For assistance determining your procedures, watch these videos on the 2-zone Danish Entry or the 3-zone Danish Entry.  

Thursday, October 12, 2017

Principle #2 - Training

By Abby Neu
Extension Educator, Poultry
neux0012@umn.edu | (320) 235 - 0726 x 2019

and Hannah Lochner
Extension Livestock Communications Intern

*Please note any templates or resources that can help you, can be found in a Google Drive folder, available to everyone.  Bookmark the site: https://z.umn.edu/NPIP for easy access.  If a resource is referenced in a post, it is linked directly to the Google Drive.


Training is an essential component to an effective biosecurity plan. Developing and carrying out biosecurity training helps you protect your flocks from disease exposure from employees and visitors, but also vehicles and equipment. Understanding disease risks will help increase the probability of compliance by employees and visitors

Larger farms may have a person designated to complete this training for new employees. Ultimately, it is the responsibility of the Biosecurity Coordinator to ensure this is done in order to maintain compliance with NPIP Biosecurity Principles.

Individuals that frequently enter the Perimeter Buffer Area, need to receive documented training once a year, at minimum. New employees are to be trained at hire with respective training documentation. You can document training in a variety of approaches including completion sheets, training logs, training completion certificates, or other equivalent record. All training records need to be retained for a minimum of 3 years. You can learn more about requirements for retaining records in the Code of Federal Regulations Title 9- CFR §145.12(b) (pg 894) and 146.11(e) (pg 950).

Your training materials should be easily accessible and cover site-specific as well as company or complex-wide specific procedures as necessary. These materials should indicate standard operating procedures for any individuals, vehicles, or equipment entering the Perimeter Buffer Area or Line of Separation.

Consider the protocol for individuals entering the Perimeter Buffer Area and crossing the Line of Separation.
  • Do they arrive showered with clean clothes and disinfected shoes? 
  • Do they need to wear barn or site-specific clothing that do not leave the premises? 
  • What is your protocol for on-site vehicles? And non-farm vehicles?
  • What disinfectant measures do you require for vehicles entering the Perimeter Buffer Area? 
  • Where do you require employees to park outside the Perimeter Buffer Area? 
Each SOP on your farm should be readily available and efficiently communicated to your employees, service or utility providers, transporters, and visitors.

Resources:

Employee Roster - to ensure all employees have completed necessary training

Training record - Individual

Training record - topic or subject

2-zone Danish Entry video

3-zone Danish Entry video

Characteristics of Disinfectants - a color-coded chart that explains advantages and disadvantages, and how they work best

Flow analysis fact sheet - an explanation of Line of Separation (LOS) and Perimeter Buffer Area (PBA) and how to go about determining what they should be on your farm

Friday, October 6, 2017

Principle #1 - Biosecurity Responsibility

*Please note any templates or resources that can help you, can be found in a Google Drive folder, available to everyone. Bookmark the site: https://z.umn.edu/NPIP for easy access. If a resource is referenced in a post, it is linked directly to the Google Drive.



When having a biosecurity plan for your farm, declare one specific person to lead the process. On a day-to-day basis, this person is responsible for the development, implementation, maintenance and ongoing effectiveness of the biosecurity plan and program. Who is your biosecurity coordinator? For the NPIP Audit, you will be required to list this person’s name. Who is your biosecurity coordinator?

The biosecurity coordinator can be on the farm, or company level depending on the size of the operation. Regardless of where this person originates from, they should be knowledgeable in the principles of biosecurity – the basics and what may be specific for your production system. They do not need specific certification to have this title, but will need to be able to describe and interpret the company’s biosecurity program.

The next step of biosecurity responsibility to have a written biosecurity plan. Many have this plan “in their head”. For numerous reasons, this plan needs to be put in paper and its location needs to be told to others.

Currently, there is no required format for how you write you plan. Some farms may have a 20 page plan with numerous additional pages of supporting documents. Your plan may be simple and fit on 4 pages. The content of your biosecurity plan should include thorough answers to the NPIP Audit Guidelines. This would include any S.O.P’s you have in place.

Begin your plan with general information about your farm.
  1. Operator name
  2. Farm name
  3. Physical address of the farm
  4. Mailing address of the farm (if different than physical address)
  5. Phone number(s)
  6. Biosecurity coordinator’s name and (work) contact information
While preparing a written biosecurity plan, the Biosecurity Coordinator may find some gaps in training or procedures. Now is the time to develop those processes and implement them. Each calendar year the biosecurity plan will need to be reviewed and revisions, if any are necessary, should be made at that time. Record of the review and any revisions need to be documented and provided for your audit.

A period of “heightened risk” can be an intense time for all producers and their employees. It is the responsibility of the biosecurity coordinator that “period of heightened risk” is clearly defined in the biosecurity plan. It is imperative to explain in the original plan how a review of the plan will occur in times of heightened risk. Documenting any communications (emails, letters, memos, phone logs, text messages, etc.) will be the duty of the coordinator as well.

If you have any questions or need other resources, please reach out to me by phone (320) 235 - 0726 x 2019 or by e-mail  neux0012@umn.edu.  I'm happy to help you through this process.


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