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Extension > Poultry News & Events > Principles #3 & #4: Line of Separation and Perimeter Buffer Area

Friday, October 20, 2017

Principles #3 & #4: Line of Separation and Perimeter Buffer Area

By Abby Neu
Extension Educator, Poultry
neux0012@umn.edu | (320) 235 - 0726 x 2019

and Hannah Lochner
Extension Livestock Communications Intern


*Please note any templates or resources that can help you, can be found in a Google Drive folder, available to everyone.  Bookmark the site: https://z.umn.edu/NPIP for easy access.  If a resource is referenced in a post, it is linked directly to the Google Drive.


An established Line of Separation and Perimeter Buffer Area plays a significant role in reducing the amount of pathogens entering and leaving poultry premises.

The Line of Separation (LOS) is defined as a functional line separating poultry housing and the poultry inside, the clean side, from exterior or outside disease exposure, the dirty side. A common LOS are the walls of the poultry barn with deviations at the entry and exit sites.

The Perimeter Buffer Area (PBA) serves a similar purpose; however, it refers to a functional boundary surrounding the farm site that separates animal barns from areas unrelated to animal production. The poultry houses, raising areas, nearby structures, and high traffic areas related to daily functions should all be included in the Perimeter Buffer Area. Your house or equipment sheds may be outside of the PBA, since they are directly unrelated to poultry production occurring on the site.

Both of these biosecurity features need to be clearly described or illustrated in your biosecurity plan. An easy way to diagram the Line of Separation and Perimeter Buffer area on your farm is to outline an aerial image of your farm site.

This video will show you step-by-step how to do this using a computer which has an internet connection and Google maps. A full demonstration using a Windows computer starts at 2:32 and a MAC version is demonstrated starting at 5:57.

WINDOWS

Step 1. Using Google Maps, enter the address of your facility and click search

Step 2. Select “Satellite” view (bottom left of screen) to see aerial image of your site.

Use the plus (+) and minus (-) bars on the bottom right-hand side of your screen to zoom in and out to include the entire site and perimeter respectively.

Step 3. For Window’s open the “Snipping Tool” from your Start Menu,

select New, then drag your cursor over the aerial view of your farm.

Step 4. *Optional* Indicate where your Line(s) of Separation are as well as your Perimeter Buffer Area. If you do not do this on your computer, this needs to be completed by hand when you have a hard-copy of the aerial image. Selecting different colors or shading can further help distinguish these areas.

Step 5. Save a copy of your snip on your computer as a photo file. This can be a JPEG, JPG, PNG or other media file.

MAC

Step 1. Using Google Maps, enter the address of your facility and click search

Step 2. Select “Satellite” view (bottom left of screen) to see aerial image of your site.

Use the plus (+) and minus (-) bars on the bottom right-hand side of your screen to zoom in and out to include the entire site and perimeter respectively.

Step 3. Create the image by pressing Command + Shift + 4 simultaneously on their keyboards which opens the “screen shot” application. Drag your cursor over the aerial view of your farm to select the image

Step 4. *Optional* Indicate where your Line(s) of Separation are as well as your Perimeter Buffer Area. If you do not do this on your computer, this needs to be completed by hand when you have a hard-copy of the aerial image. Selecting different colors or shading can further help distinguish these areas.

Step 5. Save a copy of your snip on your computer as a photo file. This can be a JPEG, JPG, PNG or other media file.

Along with including a diagram of the Line of Separation and Perimeter Buffer Area on your farm, you should also have an outline of instructions for any individuals who will be entering and exiting either one these areas. Written manuals, training videos, signage, etc. are all appropriate tools to inform visitors, employees, and utility and service providers of the procedures taken into consideration when entering and exiting each area.

For assistance determining your procedures, watch these videos on the 2-zone Danish Entry or the 3-zone Danish Entry.  

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