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Showing posts from December, 2017

Principle #13 - Reporting of Elevated Morbidity and Mortality

By Abby Neu Extension Educator, Poultry neux0012@umn.edu | (320) 235 - 0726 x 2019 And Hannah Lochner Extension Livestock Communications Assistant *Please note any templates or resources that can help you, can be found in a Google Drive folder, available to everyone. Bookmark the site: https://z.umn.edu/NPIP for easy access. If a resource is referenced in a post, it is linked directly to the Google Drive. Understanding that elevated morbidity and mortality plays a major role in analyzing and addressing your flock’s health status may help reduce the magnitude of a possible disease outbreak. Expected and elevated mortality specific to your farm needs to be defined in your biosecurity plan. Supporting documentation for analyzing and monitoring mortality rates should be kept on record. Documentation could include evidence of investigations, tracking graphs, case reports, or mortality logs. When the mortality rate meets the defined site-specific elevation, it should

Principle #12 - Feed and Litter Replacement

By Abby Neu Extension Educator, Poultry neux0012@umn.edu | (320) 235 - 0726 x 2019 And Hannah Lochner Extension Livestock Communications Intern *Please note any templates or resources that can help you, can be found in a Google Drive folder, available to everyone.  Bookmark the site: https://z.umn.edu/NPIP for easy access.  If a resource is referenced in a post, it is linked directly to the Google Drive. Because feed and litter are in direct contact with your flocks, biosecurity is essential for these production necessities. Wild birds, rodents, insects, and other animals are generally attracted to feed and litter sources and can contribute to the spread of disease.   Photo credit: Erica Sawatzke Is feed, feed ingredients and litter stored and maintained in a manner that minimizes exposure and possible contamination? Your biosecurity plan needs to ONLY address the items which are under your direct control.  Descriptions and examples such as written i

Principle #11 - Water Supply

By Abby Neu Extension Educator, Poultry neux0012@umn.edu | (320) 235 - 0726 x 2019 And Hannah Lochner Extension Livestock Communications Intern *Please note any templates or resources that can help you, can be found in a Google Drive folder, available to everyone. Bookmark the site: https://z.umn.edu/NPIP for easy access. If a resource is referenced in a post, it is linked directly to the Google Drive. Despite its various purposes, your farms source of water determines the level of disease risk associated with it. In addition to providing a drinking source for your flocks, you use water regularly for cleaning and possibly evaporative cooling. Water can play a large role in the spread of disease if not properly managed. First of all, it is most important to include in your biosecurity plan the source of your water. Is it from a private well, municipal or surface water? For the majority of our Minnesota farms, you have a well or municipal supply, which can be treate